Bulletin Extras
Local stories and or articles that are not available in any of the current printed versions of The Bishop's Bulletin.
USCCB Communications sends over 1,200 donated Bibles to unaccompanied minors detained in Arizona  
Tuesday, July 29, 2014  10:06 AM
Washington, D.C. - Over 1,200 Spanish Bibles donated by the American Bible Society and the publishing house Verbo Divino have gone to unaccompanied minors from Central America. Requested by Bishop Gerald F. Kicanas of Tucson, Arizona, the Bibles were requested by the Department of Communications of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) to the approximately 1,000 young people from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador detained by U.S. Border Patrol near Nogales, Arizona.

The American Bible Society donated some 1,000 Bibles and approximately 600 copies of “La Llave,” an edition specifically for young people. Verbo Divino donated 200 copies of their Catholic Family Bible.

Bishops Kicanas issued the call for bible donations to serve the spiritual needs of these children as they await an uncertain future. “Currently about 1,000 unaccompanied minors who have entered into the United States are being detained in a Border Patrol facility in Nogales, Arizona. They are all from Central America – Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador ­­– their physical needs are being attended to but the authorities wonder if Spanish [language] bibles could be given to the children while in the holding center to comfort them,” Bishop Kicanas said. “Many have been through some troubling and traumatic situations.”

Several dioceses and Catholic Charities offices also have responded to the unaccompanied children crisis offering humanitarian aid. And recently, Archbishop Gustavo García-Siller of San Antonio, also issued a similar call to volunteers for donations of Spanish language bibles and new testaments to be shared with unaccompanied children and women at entry points along the southern border.


'More respect for religious freedom’ needed after failed U.S. Senate vote to curtail it  
Wednesday, July 16, 2014  4:07 PM
Washington, D.C. - Today the U.S. Senate voted against considering S. 2578, a bill empowering the federal government to override the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and other federal conscience laws when it mandates including any “item or service” in health plans.

Writing “in strong opposition” to the bill earlier this week were Cardinal Seán O’Malley of Boston and Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore, chairs respectively of the U.S. bishops’ Committee on Pro-Life Activities and the Ad Hoc Committee for Religious Liberty. They wrote that S. 2578 “does not befit a nation committed to religious liberty. Indeed, if it were to pass, it would call that commitment into question. Nor does it show a genuine commitment to expanded health coverage, as it would pressure many Americans of faith to stop providing or purchasing health coverage altogether.”

A motion to take up this legislation was supported by 56 Senators but failed to achieve the 60 votes needed to proceed. Commenting on the vote, USCCB Director of Government Relations Jayd Henricks said: “While the outcome of today’s vote is a relief, it is sobering to think that more than half the members of the U.S. Senate, sworn to uphold the laws and Constitution of the United States, would vote for a bill whose purpose is to reduce the religious freedom of their fellow Americans. We need more respect for religious freedom in our nation, not less.”

Cardinal O’Malley and Archbishop Lori’s July 14 letter is available online: www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/religious-liberty/upload/07-14-14-S-2578-Cardinal-O-Malley-Archbishop-Lori-to-Senate.pdf. More information on the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and conscience rights is available at http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/religious-liberty/conscience-protection/upload/S-2578-Backgrounder.pdf and by following #HandsOffRFRA.


National Cancer Survivor Programs to be offered at Avera Cancer Institute  
Wednesday, July 16, 2014  3:15 PM
Avera Cancer Institute is offering two programs in the fall of 2014, beginning Sept. 9. Both are 12-week holistic rehabilitation programs designed to help patients regain physical, emotional and spiritual health.

A Time to Heal for Breast Cancer is for women who have completed their cancer treatment.

A Time to Heal for All Cancers is for men and women who have been treated for any type of cancer. A supportive caregiver program is included and participation is encouraged.

Small groups meet once a week for 12 sessions to discuss information related to nutrition, regaining strength, coping, relationships, happiness and mental attitude. They learn relaxation, journaling and gentle exercise techniques. Expert presenters will address these vital issues and more in the weekly sessions. Attendees may bring a spouse, friend or caregiver to the sessions.

The programs have had a positive difference in the well-being of cancer survivors. Research has shown an improved quality of life after attending the sessions. These programs aid in recovery for people who have undergone treatment for cancer, much like cardiac rehab for those who have had a heart attack.

The programs will be presented by Brenda Ling, MSW, CSW-PIP and Christina Early, MSW, CSW of Avera Cancer Institute. Interested cancer survivors may call 605-322-3000. A short registration process will be conducted. Participants receive a workbook. Cost is free.

A Time to Heal was developed by Dr. Kay Ryan, a health care consultant, speaker and trainer; and Dr. Stephanie Koraleski, a psychologist in Omaha.

Initial funding for the first program developed by A Time to Heal for breast cancer survivors came from the Susan G. Komen for the Cure. Developmental funding for the program for all survivors of cancer came from the Lance Armstrong Foundation.

“People who have information, who make healthy choices, and who feel able to make a difference in their own lives can do very well after cancer treatment,” said Dr. Ryan, a breast cancer survivor herself. A Time to Heal gives men and women access to the tools they need to be well after cancer. For more information on the national program, go to www.MyTimetoHeal.org.

About Avera Health
Avera is a regional partnership of health professionals who share support services to provide excellent care at 300 locations in 100 communities in eastern South Dakota and surrounding states. Our ministry, our people and our superior value distinguish Avera. We carry on the health care legacy of the Benedictine and Presentation Sisters, delivering care in an environment guided by our values of compassion, hospitality and stewardship. Avera employs more than 13,500. Inpatient, outpatient and clinic visits totaled nearly 2.5 million in the last year, a number equal to more than twice the population of the Avera service area. For more information, please visit www.Avera.org

 

Cardinal Sean O’Malley of Boron, Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore to Senate: oppose bill that attacks religious freedom  
Monday, July 14, 2014  3:57 PM
Washington, D.C. - In a letter sent July 14 to all U.S. Senators, Cardinal Seán O’Malley of Boston and Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore stated their “strong opposition to the misnamed ‘Protect Women’s Health From Corporate Interference Act of 2014’ (S. 2578).” Cardinal O’Malley and Archbishop Lori chair the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’s Committee on Pro-Life Activities and Ad Hoc Committee for Religious Liberty, respectively.

“Though cast as a response to the Supreme Court’s narrow decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, the bill ranges far beyond that decision, potentially attacking all existing federal protections of conscience and religious freedom regarding health coverage mandates,” they wrote.

The two bishops identified several areas of concern with the bill, including its unprecedented curtailment of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993; its potential for overriding other federal conscience protections, including the Hyde-Weldon amendment on abortion; its application to coverage mandates beyond the HHS contraceptive mandate; its application to employers beyond for-profit businesses; and its denial of religious freedom for employees and their minor dependents, not just employers.

“In short, the bill does not befit a nation committed to religious liberty. Indeed, if it were to pass, it would call that commitment into question. Nor does it show a genuine commitment to expanded health coverage, as it would pressure many Americans of faith to stop providing or purchasing health coverage altogether. We oppose the bill and urge you to reject it,” they wrote.

Full text of the letter is available online: http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/religious-liberty/upload/07-14-14-S-2578-Cardinal-O-Malley-Archbishop-Lori-to-Senate.pdf


Subcommittee on Church in Central and Eastern Europe awards $5 million in grants  
Monday, July 14, 2014  3:09 PM
Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Subcommittee on Aid to the Church in Central and Eastern Europe approved 211 grants for a total of $4,998,428 in aid to finance pastoral, educational, and construction projects in Central and Eastern Europe. The subcommittee evaluated and approved grant proposals for 2014 during the bishops’ annual spring General Assembly on June 10, in New Orleans.

The projects focus on rebuilding Catholic schools and orphanages, the formation of seminarians, and the preservation of Catholic education and intellectual life in 20 countries, covering a geographical area that extends into Central Asia. These grants are funded by the annual Collection for the Church in Central and Eastern Europe.

“As recent events in the Ukraine have clearly demonstrated, our brothers and sisters in Central and Eastern Europe stand in utmost need of our help,” said Bishop Blase J. Cupich of Spokane, Washington, chairman of the Subcommittee on Aid to the Church in Central and Eastern Europe. “The Church in these countries is doing so much good, despite recovering from the harm done in the past and facing the challenges of today’s secular culture. Through our funded projects, Catholics in the United States are sending a clear message that, in the words of Pope Francis, we want to accompany them in this new phase of their journey as disciples of Christ.”

Among the grants allocated at this meeting, the subcommittee focused their attention on the Ukraine. They approved 80 grants for pastoral work and reconstruction in that country, totaling $1,305,532. Projects that were approved include: the construction of a shelter for the homeless, operating costs for several orphanages run by the Sisters of St. Joseph, program costs for youth retreats, and Catholic television programming. Several projects will support the religious who work in the Ukraine. These grants include: the construction costs for a seminary, formation and training programs for religious sisters, and windows for monastic cells in the Holy Intercession Studite Monastery, as well as support for several seminaries and programs for priests.

“I thank each of you who have contributed to make these grants possible,” said Bishop Cupich. “And I ask for your continued prayers and financial support. Together, we can strengthen the Church in these countries by funding projects which give our Catholic sisters and brothers the resources to proclaim the faith anew in an age marked by secularism and a new atheism. We can be proud that we are helping them build on their rich heritage for future generations.”

The national date for the collection for the Church in Central and Eastern Europe is on Ash Wednesday. However, some dioceses take up the collection at other times during the year.

More information on the work of the Subcommittee on Aid to the Church in Central and Eastern Europe is available online at: www.usccb.org/catholic-giving/opportunities-for-giving/central-and-eastern-europe/index.cfm.


Mount Marty College announces Riverboat Days 5K run/walk details  
Friday, July 11, 2014  1:13 PM
Mount Marty College will hold its 16th annual Riverboat Days 5K Run/Walk on August 16, 2014 in historic downtown Yankton, South Dakota. The race will begin at the intersection of 3rd and Capital with the 5K Walk time at 7:15 a.m. and the 5K Run at 8:15 a.m. Awards will be given at 9:15 a.m. in the parking lot adjacent to the start/finish line to the top three finishers for each age group.

The entry fee for registration by July 31 is $15, after July 31 is $20, and race day is $25. Fee includes a MMC Riverboat Days 5K Run/Walk t-shirt.

Registration may be completed online at www.allsportrunning.com. Additional registration forms may be found online at www.mtmc.edu/5k and www.riverboatdays.com. Packet pickup on race day is from 6:45 am to 8:00 am. Early pick up of registration packets can be done at Cimpl Arena in room 118.

This annual event is organized and sponsored by Mount Marty College athletics. All proceeds go to support MMC student athletes. For more information, please contact the race director Randy Fischer at 605-270-2066 or at randall.fischer@mtmc.edu.

Mount Marty College, located in Yankton, South Dakota, is a Catholic, Benedictine, coeducational institute of higher learning founded in 1936 by the Benedictine Sisters of Sacred Heart Monastery. In keeping with the Benedictine tradition, the college exists as a community of learners. Primary emphasis is placed on the development of each person as a complete human being with intellectual competence, professional and personal skills, and a composite of moral, spiritual, and social values. With an enrollment of over 1,100 students on all three campuses and approximately 600 students located on the Yankton campus, Mount Marty College is the region’s premier institution for higher learning. To learn more about Mount Marty College visit www.mtmc.edu.

Mount Marty College to host Camp Invention®  
Friday, July 11, 2014  1:07 PM
Led by local educators, the weeklong Camp Invention experience immerses elementary children in hands-on activities that reinvent summer fun. This summer, your child can seek innovative solutions to real-world problems during the Camp Invention program at Mount Marty College in Yankton. The program will be held August 4-8 from 9:00am to 3:30pm each day, and is for students entering grades 1-6.

Camp Invention’s fun, hands-on activities will include: designing a small, motor-powered vehicle, receiving personalized challenges from National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductees, inventing bionic gadgets while journeying to acquire superhuman senses, and using tools to upcycle electronics and build an epic, insect-themed pinball machine.

This nationally-acclaimed STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) enrichment program is offered by Mount Marty College in collaboration with the non-profit Invent Now. The Camp Invention program will be presented by local teachers and directed by Dr. Tamara Pease, Mount Marty College assistant professor of chemistry and director of forensic science program.
Throughout the week, children work in teams to solve real-world challenges. Some activities include:

• Explore the science behind the five senses to design a bionic ear, eye, and hand

• Experiment with circuits and gears

• With inspiration from famous inventors, create your own invention

• Build a motorized “morphing” vehicle to take home!

• Design an epic, insect-themed pinball machine

For more information, go to www.campinvention.org or call 800-968-4332. Sibling discounts are available, please see website for details or contact Dr. Tamara Pease at tamara.pease@mtmc.edu or 605-668-1530 for questions.

Mount Marty College, located in Yankton, South Dakota, is a Catholic, Benedictine, coeducational institute of higher learning founded in 1936 by the Sisters of Saint Benedict of Yankton, South Dakota. In keeping with the Benedictine tradition, the college exists as a community of learners. Primary emphasis is placed on the development of each person as a complete human being with intellectual competence, professional and personal skills, and a composite of moral, spiritual, and social values. With an enrollment of over 1,100 students at all three locations and approximately 600 students located on the Yankton campus, Mount Marty College is the region’s premier institution for higher learning. To learn more about Mount Marty College visit www.mtmc.edu. 

Avera named among health care’s most wired in 2014  
Friday, July 11, 2014  10:57 AM
Avera has again been named to the list of Health Care’s Most Wired. As a health care system, the 2014 designation is Avera’s 15th Most Wired award. The list is based on the 16th annual Health Care’s Most Wired Survey, conducted by Hospitals & Health Networks magazine (H&HN).

“This designation demonstrates Avera’s continued commitment to enhance our information technology systems in ways that support improving care and delivery and reaching patient engagement goals,” said Jim Veline, Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer at Avera Health.

To achieve the Most Wired designation, organizations must meet all requirements in four areas: infrastructure, business and administrative management, clinical quality and safety, and clinical integration.

As health care transitions to more integrated and patient-centered care, hospitals are utilizing information technology to better connect care providers. For example, 67 percent of Most Wired hospitals share critical patient information electronically with specialists and other care providers. Most Wired hospitals, including Avera facilities, also have made gains by using IT to reduce the likelihood of medical errors. Among Most Wired hospitals, 81 percent of medications are matched to the patient and the medication order via bar code technology at the bedside.

“The Most Wired data show that shared health information allows clinicians and patients to have the information they need to promote health and make the most informed decisions about treatments,” says Rich Umbdenstock, President and CEO of the American Hospital Association. “Hospitals, their clinicians and their communities are doing tremendous work to enhance their IT systems in ways that support care and delivery improvement, and patient engagement goals.”

To comply with federal requirements, health care organizations such as Avera are working to adopt and meaningfully use electronic medical records. Avera began implementing its EMR in 2007, and most recently launched AveraChart, a new Internet portal through which patients can access their health history, message their care provider, view test results, request prescription renewals and more.

Health Care’s Most Wired Survey, conducted between Jan. 15 and March 15, asked hospitals and health systems nationwide to answer questions regarding their IT initiatives. Respondents completed 680 surveys, representing 1,900 hospitals, or more than 30 percent of all U.S. hospitals.

The July H&HN cover story detailing results is available at www.hhnmag.com.

About Avera Health

Avera is a regional partnership of health professionals who share support services to provide excellent care at 300 locations in 100 communities in eastern South Dakota and surrounding states. Our ministry, our people and our superior value distinguish Avera. We carry on the health care legacy of the Benedictine and Presentation Sisters, delivering care in an environment guided by our values of compassion, hospitality and stewardship. Avera employs more than 13,500. Inpatient, outpatient and clinic visits totaled nearly 2.5 million in the last year, a number equal to more than twice the population of the Avera service area. For more information, please visit Avera.org.

About the Most Wired Survey

The 2014 Most Wired Survey is conducted in cooperation with McKesson Corp., AT&T, the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives, and the American Hospital Association. 

As National Migration Conference begins, USCCB chairman reaffirms Church commitment to immigration reform and protection of vulnerable populations  
Wednesday, July 09, 2014  3:41 PM
Over 800 to participate in National Migration Conference
Participants to advocate on Capitol Hill on immigration, refugee and anti-trafficking issues
Message of compassion and justice to be sent to lawmakers

Washington, D.C. - Bishop Eusebio Elizondo, auxiliary bishop of Seattle and chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Committee on Migration, stated July 7, that the Catholic community “will continue to push” lawmakers to pass immigration reform legislation this year, regardless of political commentary that Congress is unlikely to act this year.

“Our mission as Church is to defend the rights of the migrant, no matter what the political situation or polls may dictate,” said Bishop Elizondo. “We must continue to push our lawmakers on both sides to act on this important national issue, as our fellow human beings continue to suffer under this broken system.”

Bishop Elizondo made his comments prior to the beginning of the July 7-10, National Migration Conference in Washington, at the Renaissance Hotel. The conference, held every five years, is sponsored by Migration and Refugee Services of USCCB, the Catholic Legal Network, Inc., and Catholic Charities USA.

Other issues participants will bring to lawmakers include refugee funding, anti-trafficking measures, and the humane treatment of unaccompanied children entering the country.

“As advocates for the most vulnerable, we are committed to shining the light of the Gospel on these migration issues and being the voice of the voiceless,” Bishop Elizondo said. “This is a crucial time for us to remind our lawmakers of their responsibilities to the common good, especially when it concerns the strangers among us.”

Speakers at the conference include Cardinal Oscar Andrés Rodríguez Maradiaga of Tegucigalpa, Honduras; Luis CdeBaca, head of the State Department’s Anti-Trafficking office and a panel of media experts. Over 40 workshops will be offered during the conference. Participants will advocate on Capitol Hill on Thursday, July 10.

More information and the full agenda can be found at: www.nationalmigrationconference.org.



Subcommittee on the Church in Africa awards nearly $1.3 million  
Wednesday, July 09, 2014  3:06 PM
Washington, D.C. - The U. S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Subcommittee on the Church in Africa approved 46 grants totaling $1,260,571 to assist the pastoral work of the Church in Africa. The subcommittee approved the grants during their June 10 meeting in New Orleans.

“The needs of the Church in Africa now vary, depending on the area,” said Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, retired archbishop of Washington and chairman of the Subcommittee on the Church in Africa. “The Church in Africa is growing rapidly but also facing serious challenges as it responds to the needs of its members and the surrounding society. As a result, we see more requests for training programs and the development of management and leadership skills. In many areas, the Church in Africa is working to become self-sustaining. The relationships we are developing are essential in understanding how we can be of assistance. The support and collaboration the Church in the United States is offering is an important part of this process.”

The main funded areas continued to be pastoral training, leadership formation, operational costs, and justice and peace initiatives. A grant for $30,000 to the Southern African Bishops’ Conference will fund pastoral care and legal aid for women in South Africa, Botswana and Swaziland who have suffered domestic violence and other forms of abuse. Training workshops will equip lay ministers to provide spiritual counseling. The program also intends to develop liaisons with Catholic lawyers in order to improve the quality of advice offered to women seeking legal assistance.

The subcommittee also approved a $25,000 grant to the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Ethiopia. The grant will help implement the dissemination of the apostolic exhortation Evangelii Gaudium. Ethiopia has a Catholic population of less than one percent and many people still wait to hear the gospel message. Since the major language in Ethiopia is Amharic, the national language, the project will work on translating the document into Amharic. Workshop leaders will be trained at the national level and will then work in their parishes and communities to spread the Pope’s message.

“The support of Catholics in the U.S. for the Church in Africa has a huge impact,” said Cardinal McCarrick. “This collection is an opportunity for us to join in mission to those on the outskirts, following the call of Pope Francis. We receive many expressions of gratitude from the people these programs serve.”

The grants are funded by the annual collection for the Solidarity Fund for the Church in Africa. To date, 75 percent of U.S. dioceses and eparchies have voluntarily participated in this collection. The USCCB's Subcommittee on the Church in Africa administers the collection and allocates the revenue received as pastoral grants to African episcopal conferences and their regional associations in Africa.

More information on the work of the Subcommittee on the Church in Africa can be found online at: www.usccb.org/catholic-giving/opportunities-for-giving/solidarity-fund-for-africa/index.cfm.


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